Data Science for Good City Life

On March 10, 2017 we hosted a seminar by Daniele Quercia in the Como Campus of Politecnico di Milano, on the topic:

Good City Life

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Daniele Quercia

Daniele Quercia leads the Social Dynamics group at Bell Labs in Cambridge
(UK)
. He has been named one of Fortune magazine’s 2014 Data All-Stars, and spoke about “happy maps” at TED.  His research has been focusing in the area of urban informatics and received best paper awards from Ubicomp 2014 and from ICWSM 2015, and an honourable mention from ICWSM 2013. He was Research Scientist at Yahoo Labs, a Horizon senior researcher at the University of Cambridge, and Postdoctoral Associate at the department of Urban Studies and Planning at MIT. He received his PhD from UC London. His thesis was sponsored by Microsoft Research and was nominated for BCS Best British PhD dissertation in Computer Science.

His presentation will contrast the corporate smart-city rhetoric about efficiency, predictability, and security with a different perspective on the cities, which I think is very inspiring and visionary.

“You’ll get to work on time; no queue when you go shopping, and you are safe because of CCTV cameras around you”. Well, all these things make a city acceptable, but they don’t make a city great.

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Daniele is launching goodcitylife.org – a global group of like-minded people who are passionate about building technologies whose focus is not necessarily to create a smart city but to give a good life to city dwellers. The future of the city is, first and foremost, about people, and those people are increasingly networked. We will see how a creative use of network-generated data can tackle hitherto unanswered research questions. Can we rethink existing mapping tools [happy-maps]? Is it possible to capture smellscapes of entire cities and celebrate good odors [smelly-maps]? And soundscapes [chatty-maps]?

The complete video of the seminar has been streamed live on youtube and is now available online at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z0IprrZ7phc&w=560&h=315 and embedded here:

The seminar was open to the public and hosted at the Polo Regionale di Como headquarters of Politecnico di Milano, located in Via Anzani 42, III floor, Como.

You can also download the Good City Life flyer.

When a Smart City gets Personal

When people talk about smart cities, the tendency is to think about them in a technology-oriented or sociology-oriented manner.

However, smart cities are the places where we leave and work everyday now.

Here is a very broad perspective (in Italian) about the experience of big data analysis and smart city instrumentation for the town of Como, in Italy: an experience on how phone calls, mobility data, social media, people counters can contribute to take and evaluate decisions.

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You can read it on my Medium channel.

View story at Medium.com

Modeling and Analyzing Engagement in Social Network Challenges

Within a completely new line of research, we are exploring the power of modeling for human behaviour analysis, especially within social networks and/or in occasion of large scale live events. Participation to challenges within social networks is a very effective instrument for promoting a brand or event and therefore it is regarded as an excellent marketing tool.
Our first reasearch has been published in November 2016 at WISE Conference, covering the analysis of user engagement within social network challenges.
In this paper, we take the challenge organizer’s perspective, and we study how to raise the
engagement of players in challenges where the players are stimulated to
create and evaluate content, thereby indirectly raising the awareness about the brand or event itself. Slides are available on slideshare:

We illustrate a comprehensive model of the actions and strategies that can be exploited for progressively boosting the social engagement during the challenge evolution. The model studies the organizer-driven management of interactions among players, and evaluates
the effectiveness of each action in light of several other factors (time, repetition, third party actions, interplay between different social networks, and so on).
We evaluate the model through a set of experiment upon a real case, the YourExpo2015 challenge. Overall, our experiments lasted 9 weeks and engaged around 800,000  users on two different social platforms; our quantitative analysis assesses the validity of the model.

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CityOmeters, our solution for smartcity analysis and management, presented at EXPO2015

CityOmeters, the complete solution proposed by Fluxedo for smart city management that includes social engagement via micro-planning and big data flow analytics over social content and IoT, has been presented today at EXPO 2015 in Milano, in the Samsung and TIM pavilion.
See the slides below:

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My interview on Social Media and Society: what I said (and what I didn’t)

My recent interview on the evolution of social media and its role in modern society is available on YouTube (in Italian only, sorry about that).

While the 3+ minutes of speech necessarily had to be a general overview on the role and recent changes of social media, I wish to summarise here the some technical aspects of it.

As I mentioned in the presentation:

  • social media changed a lot since their early days, from being consumed on PCs to mobile devices, from general purpose social networks connecting friends to digital stages where we “sell” our life to the entire world, from places where to share personal information to platforms where to publish also objective information coming from the real world experience.
  • social media are nowadays a valuable source of information for companies, who look for (and find) their customers through social media marketing and advertising, and public institutions and researchers, that can leverage on a large amount of data for providing benefits to our everyday life
YourExpo2015 - the Instagram Photo Challenge of Expo2015 MilanoWhat I didn’t say is how you can do that. Well, it’s pretty simple. 
The ingredients of the recipe: 
  • A lot of users sharing their profile
  • A lot of content (photos, statuses, geotags, descriptions) shared by people
  • (which makes up a VERY big data problem)
  • crawlers capturing this (or stream capturing systems) and storage as needed
  • MODELS of the context, the problem and the solution
  • and DATA ANALYSIS TOOLS for studying the data and extracting meaningful information
To me, the most valuable points are MODELS and ANALYSIS TOOLS. We are doing a lot of experiments on mixing model-driven techniques with semantic analysis, NLP, and social media monitoring. One example of our experiments is the YourExpo2015 Instagram Photo Challenge
Have a look and participate if you like. More on this coming soon!

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Community-based Crowdsourcing – Our paper at WWW2014 SOCM

Today Andrea Mauri presented our paper “Community-based Crowdsourcing” at the SOCM Workshop co-located with the WWW 2014 conference.

SOCM is the 2nd International Workshop on the Theory and Practice of Social Machines and is an interesting venue for discussing instrumentation, tooling, and software system aspects of online social network. The full program of the event is here.

Our paper is focused on community-based crowdsourcing applications, i.e. the ability of spawning crowdsourcing tasks upon multiple communities of performers, thus leveraging the peculiar characteristics and capabilities of the community members.
We show that dynamic adaptation of crowdsourcing campaigns to community behaviour is particularly relevant. We demonstrate that this approach can be very e ffective for obtaining answers from communities, with very di fferent size, precision, delay and cost, by exploiting the social networking relations and the features of the crowdsourcing task. We show the approach at work within the CrowdSearcher platform, which allows con figuring and dynamically adapting crowdsourcing campaigns tailored to different communities. We report on an experiment demonstrating the eff ectiveness of the approach.

The figure below shows a declarative reactive rule that dynamically adapts the crowdsourcing campaign by moving the task executions from a community of workers to another, when the average quality score of the community is below some threshold.

The slides of the presentation are available on Slideshare. If you want to know more or see some demos, please visit:

http://crowdsearcher.search-computing.org

 

The full paper will be available on the ACM Digital Library shortly.

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Multiplatform Reactive Crowdsourcing based on Social Networks – WWW2013

In this post I want to report on our paper on Reactive Crowdsourcing presented at the WWW 2013 conference in Rio de Janeiro, Brasil.

Here is a quick summary of motivation and idea, together with some relevant materials:

Need for control

We believe that an essential aspect for building effective crowdsourcing computations is the ability of “controlling the crowd”, i.e. of dynamically adapting the behaviour of the crowdsourcing systems as response to the quantity and quality of completed tasks or to the availability and reliability of performers.
This new paper focuses on a machinery and methodology for deploying configurable, cross-platform, and adaptive crowdsourcing campaigns through a model-driven approach.

Control through declarative active rules

In the paper we present an approach to crowdsourcing which provides powerful and flexible crowd controls. We model each crowdsourcing application as composition of elementary task types and we progressively transform these high level specifications into the features of a reactive execution environment that supports task planning, assignment and completion as well as performer monitoring and exclusion. Controls are specified as declarative, active rules on top of data structures which are derived from the model of the application; rules can be added, dropped or modified, thus  guaranteeing maximal exibility with limited effort. The paper applies modeling practices (as also explained in our book on model-driven software engineering).

Here is the presentation thatAlessandro Bozzon gave at WWW 2013:

Reactive crowdsourcing presentation on slideshare.

Prototype and experiments

We have a prototype platform that implements the proposed framework.  We have done extensive experiments with it. Our experimentations with different rule sets demonstrate how simple changes to the rules can substantially affect time, effort and quality involved in crowdsourcing activities.

Here is a short video demonstrating our approach through the current prototype (mainly centered on the crowdsourcing campaign configuration phase):

Paper and related activities

The paper can be downloaded for free from the ACM Digital Library through this link:
http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2488403 (or alternatively from the WWW site)

The paper is a follow-up of our WWW2012 paper on Crowdsearcher, which focused on exploiting social networks and crowdsourcing platforms for improving search.
The paper nicely combines with another recent contribution of ours, presented at EDBT 2013, on finding the right crowd of experts on social networks for addressing a specific problem.

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My invited post on Modeling Social Web Apps (on www.modeling-languages.com)

It’s with great pleasure that I announce my invited post on the modeling-languages.com blog, curated by Jordi Cabot.
First, I’m glad he invited me. Second, I’m happy that he asked for a post on Social-enabled Web application modeling.
I mean, we all see how social technologies are transforming our life. And yet, the modeling community and the software engineering community at large are paying very limited attention to this phenomenon.
That’s why I decided to address the problem by proposing a model-driven approach that is specifically focused on the development of Web applications that exploit social features, and my invited post is exactly focusing on this.
Basically, the proposal is to go from requirement specification down to static and dynamic design and to code generation of social applications with a pattern-based approach, which exploits goal-based requirement specification, UML modeling, and WebML models (enriched with social-specific primitives) for describing the user interaction. This image intuitively summarizes the idea:

You can find more details in the invited post on Social web application modeling on Jordi’s blog, and also check out the video that summarizes the approach:

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Efficient Subgraph Matching – Keynote by V.S. Subrahmanian at ASONAM 2012

V.S. Subrahmanian (Univ. of Maryland)
As part of the Data Management in the Social Semantic Web workshop (DMSSW workshop) at the ASONAM 2012 conference in Istanbul, Turkey, V.S. Subrahmanian (University of Maryland) gave an interesting talk on efficient subgraph matching on (social) networks.
Queries are defined as graphs themselves, with some of the places defined as constants and some defined as variables.
The complexity of queries over graphs is high, due to the large number of joins to be performed even in case of fairly simple queries.
The size of the query is typically relatively small with respect to the entire dataset (network). The proposed approaches are useful for scale of at least tens of millions of nodes in the network.

How to work on disk

The mechanism implemented is called DOGMA index and applies an algorithm called K-merge.
The algorithm builds a hierarchical index where I put at most K nodes of the graph in each index item. For obtaining that, I merge together connected nodes.You can do that randomly or more intelligently by trying to minimizing connections between nodes in different index items.
Example of DOGMA Index, where nodes of the original network (at the bottom) are merged in higher level representations in the level above (in this example, K = 4, since we have 4 nodes in each index position).
I don’t want to build the index by partitioning the whole graph, because it’s painful for large graphs. 
I start from a G0 graph, and I merge nodes until I get G1, G2, Gn graphs, each of them is more or less half the size of the previous, until Gn has K nodes or less. Then, I build the dogma index over Gn.
For the query, I can use a basic approach: identify the variable nodes that are immediately close to a constant node, and then find the possible satisfying values for those variables, starting from the constants. I can apply conditions considering distance constraints between constants and variables, as well as between candidate variable names. To allow this, I also save in every node of the index the distance of closest node in the other nodes. 

How to work on the cloud

This approach has been also implemented in the cloud, through the so called COSI Architecture, assuming a cloud of k+1 computing nodes. The implementation of the edge cuts that generates the index must be very quick and produce fairly good cuts (but not necessarily optimal).
The image below lists some of the references to S.V. works on the topic.
Some references to V.S. Subrahmanian works on subgraph matching.

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